Swiftwater

 Originally tied by Fred Brown and named for Swiftwater Creek, this version of the Swiftwater is one of the 11 Pocono named patterns listed in Don Dubois' impressive work, "The Fisherman's Handbook of Trout Flies," originally published in 1960.  This is version "A" of the Swiftwater.  The large number of variants of the Pocono flies in Don's work attests to the intense process of fly evolution and development that the rich fishery of the Poconos has spurred.

 

 

Recipe:

 

                Hook: standard wet fly, size 12

 

                Thread: black

 

                Body: peacock herl ends with orange floss midsection

 

                Throat: brown hackle

 

                Wing: grey barred mallard

 

 

 

Step 1:

 

                Tie the thread onto the hook just behind the eye and wrap a thread base to the bend. Leave a long tag end of thread and do not clip it off.

 

 

 

Step 2:

 

                Tie in a small bunch (5 or 6 strands) of peacock herl at the bend.   Return the thread a little less than a third of the way back toward the eye of the hook and leave it hanging there.

 

 

 

Step 3:

 

                Twist the peacock herl along with the tag end of thread into a rope. The tag end of thread will reinforce the herl. Now wrap the peacock herl rope in touching turns to the point where the thread is hanging (you may have to periodically re-twist the herl rope to maintain its integrity.) Tie down the herl at this point and continue to bind it along the shank of the hook another third of the way to the eye of the hook. Your thread should now be hanging at a point one third of the shank length back from the eye of the hook. Do not trim the peacock herl rope just yet.

 

 

 

Step 4:

 

                Tie in a piece of orange floss at this point and wrap the floss over the thread base you just created in the middle third of the shank. Wrap back to where the peacock herl was initially tied down and then wrap forward again to where the peacock herl is currently tied down, creating a double layer of floss over the middle third of the shank of the hook. Tie down the floss and trim the excess. Advance the thread past the peacock herl rope to a point just behind the eye of the hook (don’t bind down the peacock herl rope in the process.)

 

 

 

Step 5:

 

                Wrap the remainder of the peacock herl rope in touching turns to the point where the thread is hanging and tie it off, trimming the excess rope at this point. You should now have a body that has a midsection of orange floss with a section of peacock herl on either side of it.

 

 

 

Step 6:

 

                Tie in a bunch of brown hackle barbs underneath the hook just behind the eye to create a beard hackle.

 

 

 

Step 7:

 

                Tie in a bunch of grey mallard barred feather barbs on top of the hook for a wing. The length of the wing should extend to the bend of the hook or just beyond.

 

 

 

Step 8:

 

                Create a small thread head, whip finish, and cement.